Knitting Outside the Lines

I’m not the most adventurous knitter. I like to experiment, but generally I stick (somewhat) close to a pattern. I need the guidance.

That said, I love swatching and designing, both of which involve a lot of free knitting. But being inspired by so many other knitters and designers, I’m not completely without that guidance.

We’ve been thinking of ways that we like to deviate from the written word a little around the store, in little ways, and in dramatic ways. Some examples we’ve come up with are changing stripe arrangements, adding colors, adding shaping, and using our experience to go off on our own a little bit.

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Some of my recent experiments include the Encadre, by Julie Hoover. I altered the MC and CC in the colorwork section, and started knitting the second half first.

caitsweat

With Shibui’s Cliff sweater, I had difficulty getting the bottom ribbing to be tight enough, so I used smaller needles, a 2×2 rib, and a single color. It’s still a little loose, but much better. I also changed the neck ribbing to i-cord.

caitshrug

I started knitting Hannah Fettig’s Wispy cardi, and decided I wanted it to be a shrug. I added Cima to my Linen, and knit in garter stitch in the round for a cozy shrug that made an appearance at a summer wedding.

caithat

This hat is based on a mitten pattern Alexis Winslow designed for Brooklyn Tweed. (She’ll be here for a book signing November 1 from 2–5—you should come!) It was intended for a fingering weight; but with a little math,  I changed it to a worsted-weight hat. It’s super warm, and I don’t get to wear it enough!

lindashawl

Linda knit her Skipping Dots using our suggestions, but added a little purple stripe for that extra pop of color.

Two of the patterns feature in our newsletter this month,  Dessine-moi un mouton and Lucky No. 7, we did a little experimenting with stripe sequencing in our samples, too.

For the Lucky No. 7, Keli decided to use Swans Island Fingering instead of any of the recommended yarns, because it’s so wonderfully soft and she loves the natural colors. Searching the projects on Ravelry, she found 2 people who had worked the pattern in that yarn: one inspired her to use the lighter Natural colorway as the contrast color, and the other inspired her to use just one skein of each color to make an abbreviated cowl. Our sample knitter decided to knit the cowl with 14-row stripes of the main color, because she liked that the wider spacing made the white stripes look less busy.

For the French sweater, we knew we wanted to show off the Geilsk Wool Cotton, but we thought we’d go understated by picking just a few colors instead of knitting a whole rainbow of stripes. We laid out all the colors on the table and grouped those that looked especially nice together, finally settling on greens and neutrals. Again, Keli turned to Ravelry to check if anyone had worked the pattern with a dark main color.

We found this project in colors very similar to those we had just picked and thought it looked fabulous. To arrange the stripes, she scanned other projects on Ravelry to see what worked best, deciding that she liked the sweater most when the lower 3 stripes were very subtle and the most eye-catching stripes fell above the bust line. From there, Keli mixed the colors around a little to give the stripes a fun, random feel.

How have you been playing with your patterns?

October 22, 2014 by Cait Lamborne
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