Do the Daisy


Just in time for the Lunar New Year, we’ve released our latest pattern, the Firecracker Mitts. The stitch pattern adorning these mitts is open to interpretation—you might think of it as representing sparks to ward off evil or as lucky five-petaled plum blossoms welcoming spring. Either way, you’ll want to know how to knit it! Videos exist demonstrating how to work this evocative and highly textured stitch—commonly referred to as a daisy stitch—in a flat swatch. The Firecracker Mitts feature two slight adjustments: the stitch pattern is worked in the round for much of each mitt and a reversed version appears in the right mitt, giving you a sweetly symmetrical pair. To make everything clearer, the mitts’ designer, Bekah Stuart, walked us through how she works the daisy stitch.

Each daisy requires working into five stitches at once. Fortunately, bouncy Bannock is well-suited to the task. To make things even easier, the pattern has you prepare for each daisy by creating a group of five extra-roomy stitches. Here Bekah works on this step by wrapping her needle with yarn not just once but twice as she knits a stitch.


On the following round, when she reaches a group of double-wrapped stitches, she slips each one knitwise to her right-hand needle, releasing the extra loops in the process. That knitwise slipping closes up holes in the fabric, so she keeps the left leg of each stitch in front as she transfers all five elongated stitches back to the left-hand needle.


The next step is to work into all five stitches as if they were a single stitch, through the back loop, as shown above, for the left mitt, or through the usual front loop, as shown below, for the right mitt.


Here Bekah has worked a k1 and a yo into the group of five stitches. She’ll go on to knit one, yarn over, and knit one again, and then to drop the five elongated stitches off her left needle—one daisy done!

As you work daisies, don’t worry if you find yourself needing to redistribute your stitches so that all five stitches worked together are grouped on a single needle—it’s simply the nature of the pattern. In addition, keep in mind that while stitch markers would get in the way of making daisies, in a sense, they’re built right into your fabric. Once the pattern is established, the plain knit stitch that separates groups of elongated stitches (the “k1″ in “[CDP, k1],” for example) is worked into the central “petal” of the daisy below, as Bekah demonstrates here.


Similarly, the middle elongated stitch in a group of five will be worked into the plain knit stitch below.

The daisy stitch is a satisfying little stitch that works up quickly into a cheery set of mitts. Start yours today and begin celebrating the Year of the Sheep with Knit Purl!

February 19, 2015 by Keli Hansen
Tags: Kits Tutorial
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